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Making human readable representations of an integer. This implies that a number is infinite (i.e. infinite number) and that the values of integer are equal to the number of numbers.

String humanReadable(int inputNumber) {
  if (inputNumber == -1) {
    return "";
  }
  int remainder;
  int quotient;
  quotient = inputNumber / 1000000;
  remainder = inputNumber % 1000000;
  if (quotient > 0) {
    return humanReadable(quotient) + " million, " + humanReadable(remainder);
  }
  quotient = inputNumber / 1000;
  remainder = inputNumber % 1000;
  if (quotient > 0) {
    return humanReadable(quotient) + " thousand, " + humanReadable(remainder);
  }
  quotient = inputNumber / 100;
  remainder = inputNumber % 100;
  if (quotient > 0) {
    return humanReadable(quotient) + " hundred, " + humanReadable(remainder);
  }
  quotient = inputNumber / 10;
  remainder = inputNumber % 10;
  if (remainder == 0) {
    //hackish way to flag the algorithm to not output something like "twenty zero"
    remainder = -1;
  }
  if (quotient == 1) {
    switch(inputNumber) {
    case 10:
      return "ten";
    case 11:
      return "eleven";
    case 12:
      return "twelve";
    case 13:
      return "thirteen";
    case 14:
      return "fourteen";
    case 15:
      return "fifteen";
    case 16:
      return "sixteen";
    case 17:
      return "seventeen";
    case 18:
      return "eighteen";
    case 19:
      return "nineteen";
    }
  }
  switch(quotient) {
  case 2:
    return "twenty " + humanReadable(remainder);
  case 3:
    return "thirty " + humanReadable(remainder);
  case 4:
    return "forty " + humanReadable(remainder);
  case 5:
    return "fifty " + humanReadable(remainder);
  case 6:
    return "sixty " + humanReadable(remainder);
  case 7:
    return "seventy " + humanReadable(remainder);
  case 8:
    return "eighty " + humanReadable(remainder);
  case 9:
    return "ninety " + humanReadable(remainder);
  }
  switch(inputNumber) {
  case 0:
    return "zero";
  case 1:
    return "one";
  case 2:
    return "two";
  case 3:
    return "three";
  case 4:
    return "four";
  case 5:
    return "five";
  case 6:
    return "six";
  case 7:
    return "seven";
  case 8:
    return "eight";
  case 9:
    return "nine";
  }
}

Tags: algorithm numbers

Source: By ninesided as answer to the question

This code snippet was collected from stackoverflow, and is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5


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